What Chefs Read: The Go-To Cookbooks For Culinary Professionals

What Chefs Read: The Go-To Cookbooks For Culinary Professionals

Source Credit: This article originally appeared on Tatler Asia by Tatler Asia. Read the original article - https://www.tatlerasia.com/dining/tastemakers/what-chefs-read-best-cookbooks

Which cookbooks or food titles have been a constant go-to as a source of knowledge and/or inspiration?

In the mid 90s, it was definitely Charlie Trotter. His book on seafood (Charlie Trotters Seafood) was really ahead of its time and features a lot of unusual compilations. I bought this book in the mid 90s and it travelled with me from Hong Kong to Singapore, to Bahrain, to Macau, and then back again to Hong Kong. I usually travel light, so it really shows how much I value this book! 

Another book like this is Quay by Peter Gilmore. Quay in Sydney really focuses on nature, beautiful presentations and amazing flavour combinations. 

Larousse Gastronomique is indispensable for any chef. 

The River Cafe Cookbook by Rose Gray and Ruth Rogers features amazing Italian-inspired dishes that I love. 

Rockpool Bar and Grill by Neil Perry is another book that is very produce-driven and shows a lot of respect for produce. 

Which books have changed the way you think about food or your approach to cooking?

The Flavor Bible—both the classic and the vegetarian version (The Vegetarian Flavor Bible). Because as a chef, you think you know most of the time what ingredients and flavours pair best and work well together, but there have been times when I read this book and thought ‘wow, will that work? It sounds strange!’ But then I would try it and thought ‘well, it actually really does’. These books help to increase your knowledge and diversity to create new dishes. They are like culinary encyclopaedias and can help anyone become a more adventurous cook without being too reliant on recipes. 
 
Which food book would you recommend to home cooks/other chefs?

Bouchon by Thomas Keller: it is a classic book featuring very flavoursome dishes alongside some delicious French classics.

Vegetable Simple by Eric Ripert: this book truly respects and focuses on the vegetable itself, without overpowering it or covering up its natural flavours and textures too much. A simple but great book for vegetable and meat fans alike.

Any recent recommendations?

As the trend in the last few years has been towards vegetarian dishes, I found these quite interesting: Mr Wilkinson’s Vegetables by Matt Wilkinson, Bar Tartine by Courtney Burns and Nicolas Bala, The Chef’s Garden by Farmer Lee Jones, Bazaar by Sabrina Ghayour (Middle Eastern spiced vegetarian dishes full of vibrant flavour), and Farm, Fork, Food by Eric Skokan.

 

 

Source Credit: This article originally appeared on Tatler Asia by Tatler Asia. Read the original article - https://www.tatlerasia.com/dining/tastemakers/what-chefs-read-best-cookbooks